Goldenhand

Goldenhand by Garth Nix (#4)
☆☆☆☆/5

THE GREAT READING BINGE OF 2017

Genre: Scifi/Fantasy 

‘The library is very old, and deep, and contains many things that have been put away for good reason. Creatures, dangerous knowledge, artifacts made not wisely, but too well…books that should not be opened without proper preperation, some books that should never be open at all.’

This is the 4th installment of the Abhorsen trilogy, which I had no idea that it was that. I thought it was another Clariel, which was actually leading up to this one. Go figure, I’ve been sitting on this for weeks. 

This book picks up 6 months or so after Abhorsen  ends and we find Lireal adjusting to life without the Dispreputable Dog and learning to be Abhorsen alongside Sabriel. When Sabriel goes on vacation with her husband, things start moving under way and Lireal finds herself connected to Nick from Across the Wall and having to fight down the greater dead, ending Chlorr of the Mask once and for all and discovering what Nick is after his run in with Orannis. 

Overall, I LOVE this series and it is one of my favorites. Especially regarding the universe in which it is located. It also contains one of my all time favorite literary libraries. The only thing I disliked about this book was that each chapter swapped between 2 different characters and it was hard to follow sometimes. 

But still, a highly anticipated suprise sequel. 😀 Reminds me I need to go back and read Abhorsen again since it’s been about 6 years or so. Highly recommend this series.

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The Necromancer

Johannes Cabal: The Necromancer by Jonathan L. Howard

☆☆☆☆☆/5
THE GREAT READING BINGE OF 2016
Genre: Fiction
Best Read 2016

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Yes! Yes, technically I am a Necromancer. But I’m not one of those foolish people who take up residence in cemeteries so that they can raise an army of  dead. Have you SEEN an army of the dead? They’re more expensive than a living one, and far less use…I want to defy death. I want to…well, for want of a better word, cure it.

Oh this book was brilliant and is probably one of the BEST books I’ve read so far this year. It was wonderfully witty and came off as a Gaiman/Pratchett/Little Nicky piece which in thought, is absolutely brilliant.

Johannes Cabal is a Necromancer. He traded his soul to Satan to gain powers in necromancy, but alas, having no soul is effecting his research. So he decides to make another deal with him. 100 souls in a year and he can have his soul back. The catch? He has to do it using a Carnival and a budget. He frees his vampire brother, Horst, from a crypt he had left him 8 years prior and they take to the rails as ‘The World Renowned Cabal Brothers Carnival.’ Along the way, they meet an assortment of odd characters and Horst has to keep his brother in check, lest he loses his humanity.

I don’t hate death. It’s not a person. There’s no grim skeletal figure with a scythe. I try to avoid hating abstracts. It’s a waste of effort.

Never discuss murder plans with the victim, he reminded himself. It takes all the spontaneity out of it.

I loved, loved, loved loved this book. It was quite wordy but deliciously so. And hilarious. It had the tone of a Pratchett novel (wit, sarcasm, etc) while posing morality in the face of evil. Johannes isn’t a very good Necromancer but his heart is in the right place. And his brother is absolutely delightful.

I highly recommend this book. 😀

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Praying Drunk

Praying Drunk by Kyle Minon

☆☆☆☆/5
THE GREAT READING BINGE OF 2016
Genre: Fiction

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Q:What was the purpose of this book?
A: A

catalogue of stories and sadness, beginnings and endings, the stuff of childhood, death. Nothing new can happen here, so all you do is think about the days of life when possibility hadn’t been ripped from you forever, when anything could happen, and wonder why so much was squandered. So much

wasted.

This book was a collection of short stories about the incredibly depressing life of the author. It opens up with the story of how his uncle commited suicide, and continues on to the dark crevices of someone who suffers from manic depression. Preacher turned author Kyle captures the rawness of hurt and solitude in such a way that you will cry while reading and possibly throw up a bit.

This was a terrifyingly good read. I recommend it to those who like books on the morbid side.

If I lose my demons, I lose my angels as well.

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The Cat

The Cat by Edeet Ravel

☆☆☆☆☆/5
Genre: Fiction
THE GREAT READING BINGE OF 2016
Trigger Warning: Grief/Death/Depression/Suicide

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But there are no rewrites in life. No matter how implausible and unlikely an event, there is no rewriting it.

Single mom Elsie takes her son to the shelter to adopt a cat. They pick Pursie (short for Persephone) and take her home. 5 years later, her son is accidently killed in their front yard by a driver under the influence and Elsie is forced to stay alive. For Pursie.

This book was about the madness and depression that comes with the passing of a loved one. Elsie was tormented, broken, suicidal and only managed to hold on because she needed to care for her sons beloved cat  (who was quite the character.) Over the course of the story, you see her begin to pull through and to be ‘okay’.

I did all right. I don’t know what’s worse, feeling deranged or doing all right. For there’s something ruthless about doing all right.

You see her begin to try and to take note and attempt to get better. She faces this journey alone and at the end reaches out to people.

This book struck a chord with me on a deep, emotional level. I have been in that dark and lonely place and the only thing keeping me grounded was my cats and their needs. No matter what, no matter how bad my brain was, they never went hungry or had dirty boxes. They are my rocks, as Pursie was for Elsie. She resented her for awhile because she wanted to join her son on the other side, but she realized having Pursie there saved her.

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(My cats continue to keep me grounded.)

I HIGHLY recommend this book. I thought it summed up depression and grief in a way that is highly relatable. The pain was very real and it shows that animals can be our shining light in the darkest of times.

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The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells

The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells by Andrew Sean Greer

☆☆☆☆/5
Genre: Fiction
17/Clearly not 40 THE GREAT READING BINGE OF 2016

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Its unlikely to be alive, isn’t it? The right temperature and gravity, the right atoms combining at the precise right moment, you’d think it would never happen…Life, it’s so unlikely…It’s so much better than we think, isn’t it?

Oh, I liked this one. I have a good judge of whimsical picking I think.

It is almost impossible to capture true sadness; it is a deep sea creature that can never be brought into view. I say that I remember being sad, but in truth I only remember mornings when that person- the person which I contained- could not go to work, could not do the things she knew could save her, and instead did only what was bound to destroy her: alcohol, forbidden cigarettes, and endless lost, black hours of lonliness.

Greta Wells is 31 years old and has just lost her twin brother. In the torment of depression, she undergoes electoshock therapy to get better. Instead she finds herself transplanted from her world of 1985 and in the war torn 1918. As a Greta from a different life. Another treatment later, she finds herself in 1945. The people around her are the same, but their lives lead different paths. Each treatment leads to another time shift between these years. Greta takes it upon herself to help the “other” Gretas’ while facing the choice of what time she thinks she’s best suited for. In 1919 where her husband has returned from the world a changed man? In 1945 where she is both wife and mother at the start of WWII? Or in her own time in 1985, where he brother has died and her lover left her? The choice is both hard and suprising. (Just to clarify, in each world there was a Greta, Aunt Ruth, Felix [brother], Nathan [husband/lover], Alan [Felix’s boyfriend], and so on).

This book was beautifully written and captured depression in a way that makes sense. To lose someone you love and the choices you make that define your life. The Launguage was beautifully poised and flowed flawlessly. If you could, would you sacrifice everything to be with your loved ones again? It also took a good look at how homosexulaity was treated during different time frames.

If only we just loved who we’re supposed to love.

I highly recommend this book. Everything about it was good. 🙂 As a side note, it took twice as long to read as it should have due to the migrane and I have found my notes illegible. D:

But we do wake, each of us, to find things have gone differently. The love we thought had killed us has not killed us after all, and the dream we had for ourselves has shifted elsewhere, like a planet our starship is set for; we have but to lift our heads and right ourselves, move toward it once again and start the day. We will not get there in our lifetime…What’s the point? A journey to the stars that none will see but our children’s children?

To see the shape of life, is all we answer.

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